DermaLase - Flying Ink Fragments

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Tattoo Ink Fragments

Microscopic Analysis

Mike discovered, in 2012, that tattoo ink fragments are leaving the skin at high velocity during QS laser treatments. This was previously unknown!

He had developed a technique using glass slides which resulted in less pain, less epidermal damage and less surface bleeding and risk of infection. However, one day he noticed some 'pit' marks on the glass slides after teratments. On examination under an optical microscope he observed fragments of tattoo ink, some of which had penetrated into the glass!

He has since calculated that some of these ink fragments might be flying out of the skin at 700 metres per second!!! That is Mach 2 - the speed that Concorde used to fly across the Atlantic!

However, these high-speed particles may indicate a possible source of contamination. Mike is currently investigating the slides for traces of bacteria and/or virsues, and whether these represent an infection hazard.


'Insects'

As you can see from some of the photos, some of these fragments appear to look like insects, under the microscope. Mike thinks this may be due to the high-speed ink hitting the hard galss, penetraing into it and melting. This results in the ink becoming liquid which then spreads out. Many of these 'insects' appear quite symetrical, which suggests a smearing process.

 

Pit marks on the slide:

Ink fragments on the glass surface:

Ink fragments inside the glass - with the appearence of 'insects':

 

 

 

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